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93rd Bomb Group

Group

93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) was activated 1-March-1942 at Barksdale Field, Louisiana. On 15-May-1942 the Group moved to Ft. Myers, Florida to continue advanced flight training and also to fly anti-submarine patrols over the Gulf of Mexico; they claimed 3 U-Boats destroyed. Between 2-15-August-1942 the Group moved to Fort Dix, New Jersey to prepare for deployment overseas. The ground echelon departed for the UK on the Queen Elizabeth on 31-August-1942 and the air echelon moved to Grenier Field, New Hampshire and was refitted with B-24Ds. The group was first located at Station 102, Alconbury between 6-Sep-1942 and 6-Dec-1942. The Group flew 396 missions in 8,169 sorties and dropped 19,004 tons of bombs with 100 aircraft MIA.

93rd Bomb Group was one of the three 8th Air Force B-24 groups that were sent TDY to North Africa in support of 12th Air Force on 12-Dec-1942. The 329th Bomb Squadron remained behind and took up residence at Hardwick. The 328BS, 330BS and 409BS flew to the initial station at Tafarouri, Algeria but the field there was not suited for the heavy bombers and they only conducted two missions from that field. They were then moved Gambut Main, Libya, a field assigned to 9th Air Force. They remained there until 22-February 1943 at which time they returned to Hardwick until 26-Jun-1943.

In late June 1943 the Group was once again sent TDY to 9th AF at Bengazi, Libya for Operation TIDAL WAVE. On 1 August 1943 they participated in the famous mission against the oil targets at Ploesti, Romania. The Squadrons then returned to Hardwick on 27-Aug-1943 and the Group flew missions from that station until the unit Group sent back to the United States on 12-Jun-45.

CLAIMS TO FAME:
Oldest B-24 Bomb Group in 8th Air Force
Flew most missions of any Group in 8th Air Force
First Bomb Squadron (329th) to penetrate German airspace 2-Jan-43
Most traveled Bomb Group in 8th Air Force
First heavy bomber to fly 25 missions: B-24 41-23728 'Hot Stuff' 330BS
First B-24 to complete 50 missions 'Boomerang'
Only wartime unit in the USAF that has not been inactivated since its original formation.

Browse 93rd Bomb Group photographs and other documents in the 2nd Air Division Memorial Library digital archive here: www.2ndair.org.uk/digitalarchive/Dashboard/Index/50

US Air Force Combat Units of World War II Description

Constituted as 93d Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Mar 1942. Prepared for combat with B-24’s. Engaged in antisubmarine operations over the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, May-Jul 1942. Moved to England, Aug-Sep 1942, and assigned to Eighth AF. Entered combat on 9 Oct 1942 by attacking steel and engineering works at Lille. Until Dec 1942, operated primarily against submarine pens in the Bay of Biscay. A large detachment was sent to North Africa in Dec 1942, the group receiving a DUC for operations in that theater, Dec 1942-Feb 1943, when, with inadequate supplies and under the most difficult desert conditions, the detachment struck heavy blows at enemy shipping and communications. The detachment returned to England, Feb-Mar 1943, and until the end of Jun the group bombed engine repair works, harbors, power plants, and other targets in France, the Low Countries, and Germany. A detachment returned to the Mediterranean theater, Jun-Jul 1943, to support the invasion of Sicily and to participate in the famous low-level attack on enemy oil installations at Ploesti on 1 Aug. Having followed another element of the formation along the wrong course to Ploesti, the 93d hit targets that had been assigned to other groups, but it carried out its bombing of the vital oil installations despite heavy losses inflicted by attacks from the fully-alerted enemy and was awarded a DUC for the operation. Lt Col Addison E Baker, group commander, and Maj John L Jerstad, a former member of the group who had volunteered for this mission, were posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for action in the Ploesti raid: refusing to make a forced landing in their damaged B-24, these men, as pilot and co-pilot of the lead plane, led the group to bomb the oil facilities before their plane crashed in the target area. After the detachment returned to England in Aug 1943, the group flew only two missions before the detachment was sent back to the Mediterranean to support Fifth Army at Salerno during the invasion of Italy in Sep 1943. The detachment rejoined the group in Oct 1943, and until Apr 1945 the 93d concentrated on bombardment of strategic targets such as marshalling yards, aircraft factories, oil refineries, chemical plants, and cities in Germany. In addition it bombed gun emplacements, choke points, and bridges near Cherbourg during the Normandy invasion in Jun 1944; attacked troop concentrations in northern France during the St Lo breakthrough in Jul 1944; transported food, gasoline, water, and other supplies to the Allies advancing across France, Aug-Sep 1944 ; dropped supplies to airborne troops in Holland on 18 Sep 1944; struck enemy transportation and other targets during the Battle of the Bulge, Dec 1944-Jan 1945; and flew two missions on 24 Mar 1945 during the airborne assault across the Rhine, dropping supplies to troops near Wesel and bombing a night-fighter base at Stormede. Ceased operations in Apr 1945. Returned to the US, May-Jun 1945.

Commanding officers
  • Addison Baker

    Military | Lieutenant Colonel | Commanding Officer | 93rd Bomb Group
    Lieutenant Colonel Addison Baker was the Commanding Officer of the 93rd Bomb Group from May 17, 1943, he was killed in Action over Ploesti during Operation Tidal Wave on 1 August, 1943. ...

  • Edward Timberlake

    Military | Brigadier General | Commanding General | 453rd Bomb Group
    From FindAGrave: ...

  • Harvey Barnard

    Military | Colonel | Commanding Officer | 93rd Bomb Group
    Commanding Officer 93rd Bomb Group,27-Sep-44 to 27-Nov-44. Led the 2nd Air Division 8 times. On 11 July raid I changed targets from Primary (airfield east of Hamburg) to Secondary (Hamburg itself) because of weather report over the Primary. Flak...

  • Leland Fiegel

    Military | Colonel | Commanding Officer 93rd BG, Air Executive, Deputy Wing Commander | 381st Bomb Group
    Commanding Officer of the 93rd Bomb Group 9-August-1943 to 27-Sep-1944. Air Executive with Headquarters (381st Bomb Group). Commanding Officer 20th BG, 17 May 1945. Deputy Wing Commander 20th Combat Bomb Wing, 18 June 1945.

  • Robert Tate

    Military | 93rd Bomb Group

  • Thermand Brown

    Military | Lieutenant Colonel | Commanding Officer | 93rd Bomb Group

  • William Robertson

    Military | Colonel | Pilot | 93rd Bomb Group
    Commanding Officer 93rd BG from 5-Dec-44 to 6-Apr-45. Went on 14 combat missions to Germany just prior to war's end in 1945. Mission list attached. DFC/ BS/ AM/ ATO/ EAME w/ 3 battle stars/ WW II VM/ Korean Svc.

Structure

Part of
  • 1st Combat Bomb Wing
  • 20th Combat Bomb Wing
  • 2nd Combat Bomb Wing
  • 1st Bomb Wing

    1st Bomb Wing

    Wing
    The First Bomb Wing arrived in the UK in July 1942. The wing command became the 1st Bomb Division in August 1943, while the wing was retitled the 1st Combat Bomb Wing.

  • 2nd Bomb Wing

    2nd Bomb Wing

    Wing
    The 2nd Bomb Wing arrived in the UK in July 1942. The wing command became the 2nd Bomb Division in August 1943, while the wing was retitled the 2nd Combat Bomb Wing.

Encompassing
Previously was
Not yet known
Became
Not yet known

Missions

  • VIII Bomber Command 14

    9 October 1942
    Bombers are dispatched to bomb the steel and engineering works of the Compagnie de Fives at Lille, France and the locomotive and freight car works of Ateliers d'Hellemmes at Lille which are the Primary (P) targets. Other targets are Courtrai Airfield,...

  • VIII Bomber Command 15

    21 October 1942
    German U-Boat pens are Lorient, France are the Primary (P) targets for this mission along with the German airfield at Cherbourg, France. 93BG despatches 24-B-24s to Lorient, but cloud cover prevents them from bombing. The main attack force to Lorient...

  • VIII Bomber Command 16

    7 November 1942
    A combined bomber force of 56 B-17s are despatched by 91BG, 301BG and 306BG to bomb the U-Boat pens at Brest, France. This is the first mission flown by 91st Bomb Group. This element is joined by 12 B-24s from 93BG. To aide the attacking bomber force,...

  • VIII Bomber Command 16

    7 November 1942
    A combined bomber force of 56 B-17s are despatched by 91BG, 301BG and 306BG to bomb the U-Boat pens at Brest, France. This is the first mission flown by 91st Bomb Group. This element is joined by 12 B-24s from 93BG. To aide the attacking bomber force,...

  • VIII Bomber Command 18

    9 November 1942
    The U-Boat pens at St. Nazaire, France are the target of this mission conducted by a combined force of 33 B-17s from 91BG and 306BG together with a combined force of 14 B-24s from 44BG and 93BG. The B-24 formation bombs from altitudes between 17,500 ft...

  • VIII Bomber Command 19

    14 November 1942
    The U-Boat pens of La Pallice, France are the Primary(P) target for a combined bomber force of 21 B-17s from 91BG (14) and 306BG (7); 93BG also joins the raid with 13 B-24s. However, La Pallice is completely clouded over, so instead, the bombers attack...

  • VIII Bomber Command 19

    14 November 1942
    The U-Boat pens of La Pallice, France are the Primary(P) target for a combined bomber force of 21 B-17s from 91BG (14) and 306BG (7); 93BG also joins the raid with 13 B-24s. However, La Pallice is completely clouded over, so instead, the bombers attack...

  • VIII Bomber Command 20

    17 November 1942
    The U-Boat pens at St. Nazaire, France are the Primary (P) target for a combined force of 49 B-17s despatched from 91BG (20), 303BG (16) and 306BG (13). Another element of 14 B-24s despatched from 93BG also joins the bombing force on St. Nazaire. The...

  • VIII Bomber Command 21

    18 November 1942
    The U-Boat pens at Lorient and La Pallice, France are the Primary (P) targets for this mission. However, those at St. Nazaire, France are attacked by 21 B-17s of 303BG when they are mistaken for those of Lorient. The force attacking Lorient is composed...

  • VIII Bomber Command 22

    22 November 1942
    The U-Boat pens at Lorient, France are the Primary (P) target of this mission. A combined force of 68 B-17s despatched from 91BG (18), 303BG (18) 305BG (23) and 306BG (9) against the target but a 10/10 could cover prevents all but 11 from 303BG from...

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Stations

Station Location Date
Established 1 March 1942
Based Alconbury 6 September 1942 – 6 December 1942
Based Hardwick 6 December 1942 – 10 December 1942
Based Hardwick 27 August 1943 – 12 June 1945

Connections

People

  • Clay Aaker

    Military | 93rd Bomb Group

  • John Abajian

    Military | Colonel | Pilot | 93rd Bomb Group
    John Abajian piloted 28 missions in a B-24 out of England over enemy territory and received many commendations for heroism. After his combat tour ended, he was sent to Walla Walla Air Base to train pilots. Here, he met Mary Lou Hooper at the air base...

  • Franklin Abbott

    Military | 93rd Bomb Group

  • George Abbott

    Military | Staff Sergeant | Crew Chief | 93rd Bomb Group
    Crew Chief on Maulin' Mallard Sr #42109867 Good Conduct Medal,EAMES Ribbon, Dist Unit Badge

  • Bernard Abel

    Military | Lieutenant Colonel | Pilot | 93rd Bomb Group
    27 missions

  • Lauren Abell

    Military | 93rd Bomb Group

  • Joseph Abels

    Military | 93rd Bomb Group

  • Carroll Abernathy

    Military | Staff Sergeant | Payroll | 93rd Bomb Group

  • William Abott

    Military | 93rd Bomb Group

  • Sheldon Abraham

    Military | 93rd Bomb Group

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Aircraft

  • 41-110033 Arizona Rambler

    B-24 Liberator
    29 March 1944, two B24s collided over Henham, a few miles from Halesworth airfield. 9 Crew of the 41-110033 died, and 7 of the 41-28590. During the rescue operations the bomb load of one of the Liberators exploded, killing 6 men from Halesworth.

  • 41-23666 Hot Freight

    B-24 Liberator
    B-24D-1-CO 41-23666 [AG:s] was assigned to the 93BG/330BS at Hardwick, UK. on 18-Mar-43 the aircraft was despatched on a mission to bombe the port facilities at Vegesack, Germany. The aircraft sustained battle damage over the target and crashed near...

  • 41-23672 'Double Trouble'

    B-24 Liberator
    Assigned to 328th BS, 93rd BG, 8th AF. Failed to Return (FTR) Over Water (OW). Lost to flak and fighters on 19-Jan-43. Crashed into the sea 150 miles S.E. of Malta. MACR 15484.

  • 41-23711 'Jerks Natural'

    B-24 Liberator
    Assigned to 328th BS, 93rd BG, 8th AF, TDY 9th Benghazi, Libya. This aircraft flew the Aug. 1, 1943, Ploesti mission, diverting safely to Sicily. A/C was damaged over Austria on mission to Wiener Neustadt Bf 109 factory and crashed in Yugoslavia on...

  • 41-23717 Exterminator

    B-24 Liberator
    The B-24 Liberator "Exterminator" (serial number 41-23717, H) originally flew with the 329th Bomb Squadron of the 93rd Bomb Group and was later transferred to the 330th Bomb Squadron (93BG) in March 1943. The first mission with the 330th BS was on 1st...

  • 41-23728 Hot Stuff

    B-24 Liberator
    The B-24 Liberator Hot Stuff was the 1st heavy bomber in the 8th Air Force to complete 25 missions even though the B-17 Memphis Belle wears the label. Hot Stuff crashed into a mountain in bad weather on its way back to the United States to tour the...

  • 41-23729 'Shoot Luke'

    B-24 Liberator
    Assigned 328th Bomb Squadron, 93rd Bomb Group, 8th Air Force. TDY 9th AF, Benghazi. Flew on 1st Aug 43 Ploesti oil refinery raid, forced to abort. ...

  • 41-23732 Liberty Lass

    B-24 Liberator

  • 41-23810 'Tarfu'

    B-24 Liberator
    Flew on 1st Aug 43 Ploesti oil refinery raid, returned safely to Libya. ...

  • 41-24111 'Picadilly Filly'

    B-24 Liberator
    Assigned 329th BS, 93rd BG, 8th AF. ...

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Citations

Distinguished Unit Citation: North Africa, 17 Dec 1942 - 20 Feb 1943
Distinguished Unit Citation: Ploesti, Romania, 1 Aug 1943
Medal of Honor: Lt Col Addison E. Baker (Posthumous) 1-Aug-1943
Medal of Honor: Maj John L. Jerstad (Posthumous) 1-Aug-1943

Revisions

Date Contributor Update
23 August 2019 12:03:37 Emily Changes to nicknames, insignia, us air force combat units of world war ii description and commanding officers associations
Sources

Air Force Combat Units of WWII

Date Contributor Update
30 August 2018 21:33:02 Kickapoo Changes to nicknames
Sources

Into The Fire - Duane Schultz

Date Contributor Update
09 March 2018 15:48:37 2nd Air Division Memorial Library Changes to description
Sources

2nd Air Division Memorial Library

Date Contributor Update
06 February 2018 18:12:05 2nd Air Division Memorial Library Changes to unit encompassing associations
Sources

2nd Air Division Memorial Library

Date Contributor Update
25 November 2014 18:45:39 Lee8thbuff Changes to description and mission associations
Sources

Lee Cunningham 25-Nov-2014. Corrected Barksdale location from Florida to Louisiana.

Date Contributor Update
25 November 2014 18:39:29 Lee8thbuff Changes to name, description, mission associations and stations
Sources

Lee Cunningham 25-Nov-2015. Added early history and statistics per http://www.usaaf.com/8thaf/bomber/93bg.HTM.

Date Contributor Update
18 November 2014 10:31:03 Lucy May Changes to type, name, nicknames, motto, citations, description, air forces, aircraft types, unit part of associations, unit encompassing associations, person associations, aircraft associations, commanding officers associations, mission associations and stations
Sources

Combined two entries for the 93rd Bomb Group into a single entry. This entry now includes information from the following contributors and sources:
Sam_Martin used 'Maurer, Maurer, Ed., Air Force Combat Units of World War II. U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, D.C., 1961.'

Lee8thbuff used: http://www.usaaf.com/8thaf/bomber/93bg.HTM; http://www.93rdbombardmentgroup.com/historyfull.html;

Date Contributor Update
12 November 2014 19:29:00 Lee8thbuff Changes to type, category, name, description, air forces, aircraft types, unit part of associations, unit encompassing associations, mission associations and stations
Sources

Lee Cunningham 12-Nov-2014. PURGE duplicate entry

Date Contributor Update
03 October 2014 21:03:31 Paul Bellamy Changes to mission associations and stations
Sources

1st Air Division records (1AD HQ Historical Society)

Date Contributor Update
03 October 2014 20:03:28 Paul Bellamy Changes to type, aircraft types and mission associations
Sources

1st Air Division records (1AD HQ Historical Society)

Date Contributor Update
27 September 2014 18:42:46 AAM AAM ingest
Sources

Drawn from the records of the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force, Savannah, Georgia / Paul Andrews, Project Bits and Pieces, 8th Air Force Roll of Honor database / The Mighty Eighth. A History of the Units, Men and Machines of the US 8th Air Force.' by Roger A. Freeman (1989). 'Air Force Combat Units of World War II' compiled by the Department of the US Air Force, edited by Maurice Maurer (1983). / Units in the UK from ETOUSA Station List, as transcribed by Lt. Col. Philip Grinton (US Army, Retired) and extracted by IWM; air division data from L.D. Underwood, based on the 8th Air Force Strength Report of 6th August 1944, as published in 'The 8th Air Force Yearbook' by Lt. Col. John H Woolnough (1980)

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