Image
Share this
STORY

The first Army Air Force Combat mission in Europe during the Second World War

Mauris blandit aliquet elit, eget tincidunt nibh pulvinar a. Mauris blandit aliquet elit, eget tincidunt nibh pulvinar a. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Donec velit neque, auctor sit amet aliquam vel, ullamcorper sit amet ligula.

Vivamus magna justo, lacinia eget consectetur sed, convallis at tellus. Mauris blandit aliquet elit, eget tincidunt nibh pulvinar a. Donec rutrum congue leo eget malesuada.

Curabitur arcu erat, accumsan id imperdiet et, porttitor at sem. Curabitur aliquet quam id dui posuere blandit. Mauris blandit aliquet elit, eget tincidunt nibh pulvinar a.

People

Explore

Explore Airfields

Black construction engineers were tasked with building the airfields from which vast fleets of American bombers and fighters would be launched as part of the Allied aerial campaign.

Learn More

Black people had participated in every major American conflict since the birth of the nation. And though by 1940, the War Department had removed a number of restrictions on permitting African Americans to join the armed forces under the Selective Service Act, society as a whole remained racially segregated. This separation of black and white people in the US was upheld by state and local laws, referred to as ‘Jim Crow’, and was particularly notable in the American deep south. These laws excluded black American citizens from economic and political rights.

The War Department, unwilling to be used, as officials put it, as ‘a sociological laboratory’, isolated black troops into all-black units and provided them with separate training facilities and accommodation. Though the War Department hailed the conflict against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan as a fight for liberty, they simultaneously continued a long-established doctrine that maintained that black people should be ‘separate but equal.’

Black people had participated in every major American conflict since the birth of the nation. And though by 1940, the War Department had removed a number of restrictions on permitting African Americans to join the armed forces under the Selective Service Act, society as a whole remained racially segregated. This separation of black and white people in the US was upheld by state and local laws, referred to as ‘Jim Crow’, and was particularly notable in the American deep south. These laws excluded black American citizens from economic and political rights.

The War Department, unwilling to be used, as officials put it, as ‘a sociological laboratory’, isolated black troops into all-black units and provided them with separate training facilities and accommodation. Though the War Department hailed the conflict against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan as a fight for liberty, they simultaneously continued a long-established doctrine that maintained that black people should be ‘separate but equal.’