Skip to main content
Edit entry 

67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group

Group

The four Squadrons of the 67th Recon Group (12th Observation - later Reconnaissance Squadron; 107th Observation - later Reconnaissance Squadron; 109th Observation - later Reconnaissance Squadron and 153rd Observation - later Reconnaissance Squadron) were the oldest in the American air force, dating back to 1917. Although formally with the Eighth Air Force, the Group flew Spitfires and Bostons (Havocs) with the RAF and trained on detachment at various stations until they were assigned to the Ninth Air Force for combat operations in November 1943. At this point they moved from Membury to Middle Wallop, Hampshire, and flew adapted Mustangs in reconnaissance missions over northern France. One of their objectives was to collect information about enemy coastal defences in preparation for Operation Neptune.

US Air Force Combat Units of World War II Description

Constituted as 67th Observation Group on 21 Aug 1941. Activated on 1 Sep 1941. Flew antisubmarine patrols along the east coast of the US after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Began training in Jan 1942 for duty overseas. Moved to the European theater, Aug-Oct 1942. Assigned first to Eighth and later (Oct 1943) to Ninth AF. Redesignated 67th Reconnaissance Group in May 1943,67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group in Nov 1943, and 67th Reconnaissance Group in Jun 1945. Trained in England for more than a year before beginning operations in Dec 1943. Used P-38's, P-51's, and F-5's to fly artillery-adjust-adjustment, weather-reconnaissance, bomb-damage assessment, photographic-reconnaissance, and visual-reconnaissance missions. Received a DUC for operations along the coast of France, 15 Feb-20 Mar 1944, when the group flew at low altitude in the face of intense flak to obtain photographs that aided the invasion of the Continent. Flew weather missions, made visual reconnaissance for ground forces, and photographed enemy positions to sup port the Normandy campaign and later to assist First Army and other Allied forces in the drive to Germany. Took part in the offensive against the Siegfried Line, Sep- Dec 1944, and in the Battle of the Bulge, Dec 1g44-Jan 1945. From Jan to May 1945, photographed dams on the Roer River in preparation for the ground offensive to cross the river, and aided the Allied assault across the Rhine and into Germany. Returned to the US, Jul-Sep 1945. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Structure

Part of
  • Headquarters (8th Air Force)

    Headquarters (8th Air Force)


    8th Air Force Headquarters opened in London under the command of General Carl A Spaatz on 19 June 1942. It oversaw all Commands, Wings and Groups engaged in the Strategic Bombing Campaign until February 1944, when it became US Strategic Air Forces in...

  • IX Air Support Command
  • VIII Ground Air Support Command

    VIII Ground Air Support Command

    Command
    Constituted as VIII Ground Air Support Command on 24 April 1942, activated 28 April 1942 at Bolling Field, DC under the command of Brig Gen Robert C. Candee. Assigned to the Eighth US Army Air Force. Moved to England, without tactical components, in...

  • VIII Air Support Command
Encompassing
Previously was
Became
Not yet known

Missions

  • VIII Air Support Command PHOTO RECCE

    30 July 1943
    A Boston IIIA from 107Squadron RAF was despatched with an American crew to make a photographic reconnaissance of the Schipol airfield at Amsterdam, Holland. The pilot became disoriented in the clouds and crashed the aircraft into the sea. 4KIA MACR 146.

  • VIII Air Support Command 26 PHOTO RECCE

    18 August 1943
    2 A-20s are despatched from 67th Reconnaissance Group on their first mission to conduct photographic reconnaissance over Lannion and the Brest Penninsula of France. The A-20s are escorted by Spitfires from RAF 610 Squadron. There are no losses or claims.

  • VIII Air Support Command 29 PHOTO RECCE

    19 August 1943
    2 A-20s from 67th Reconnaissance Group are despatched to perform photographic reconnaissance over the Lannion/Brest penninsula of France. There are nol losses or claims. The A-20s are escorted by Spitfires from RAF 610 Squadron.

  • VIII Air Support Command 32 PHOTO RECCE

    23 August 1943
    2 A-20s from 67th Reconnaissance Group are despatched to obtain photographs of St. Michel, France. No losses or claims.

  • VIII Air Support Command 37

    27 August 1943
    2 A-20s from 67th Reconnaissance Group are despatched to fly a photo recce mission over NW, France. No losses or claims.

  • VIII Air Support Command 43

    3 September 1943
    1 A-20 is despatched from 67th Reconnaissnace Group on a photo recce sotie over Lerun and Kergal areas of Brittany. No losses or claims.

  • VIII Air Support Command 46

    3 September 1943
    1 A-20 from 67th Reconnaissance Group is despatache to fly a photo recce sortie from St. Michel -en-Grave to Keraline, France. No losses or claims.

  • VIII Air Support Command 49

    5 September 1943
    2 A-20s from 67th Reconnaissance Group are despatched to fly photo recce over St. Pol-de-Leon, France. There are no losses or claims.

  • VIII Air Support Command 60 PHOTO RECCE

    17 September 1943
    One A-20 is despatched from 67th Reconnaissance Group to fly a photo recce sortie over the Brest Peninsula, France. No losses or claims.

Stations

Station Location Date
Based Membury 6 September 1942 – 12 December 1943
Based Middle Wallop 12 December 1943 – July 1944
Based Le Molay July 1944 – August 1944
Based Toussus Le Noble August 1944 – September 1944
Based Charleroi September 1944 – March 1945
Based Vogelsang March 1945 – 2 April 1945
Based Limburg 2 April 1945 – 10 April 1945
Based Eschwege 10 April 1945 – 8 May 1945

Connections

People

  • John Becker

    Military | Flight Officer | Pilot | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    Training flight in Spitfire VB X4669 crashed probably due to a glycol leak. The 67th was a reconnaissance group.

  • Alexander Beyer

    Military | Sergeant | Gunner | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    Killed in Action (KIA). Detached to 107th SQ RAF on July 30, 1943 when lost on mission to Holland in ac Boston BZ293.

  • Franklin Burt

    Military | First Lieutenant | Pilot | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    Killed whilst gaining operational experience flying Spitfire Vc EE746 with 131 Sqn RAF when attacked by FW 190. Went down in channel near Dunkirk. 1st Lt Franklin D Burt was a member of 12th Recon Squadron, 67th Reconnaissance Group USAAF. ...

  • Stanley Canner

    Military | First Lieutenant | Pilot | 10th Photographic Reconnaissance Group

  • John Cheatham

    Military | First Lieutenant | Observer | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    15 May 1943 on a practice bombing mission in ac A-20B-DL 41-3400, ac caught on fire approaching landing at Keevil. Crew returned to service.

  • Sherman Childers

    Military | Lieutenant | Pilot | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    My father, Lt. Sherman F. Childers, flew with the 67th TRG, 109th TRS, in France, Belgium and Germany. His P-51 aircraft had the nose art “Oh Johnie” her name being his teenage bride in Oklahoma. He met my mother who was a USO dancer in France during...

  • Pervy Clearman

    Military | Sergeant | Gunner | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    29 July 1943 problems with landing gear on navigational training mission in A20B 43-3370

  • Hal Conner

    Military | Captain | Pilot | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    21 May 1943bailed out on training mission in Spitfire EN864 when engine cut out. RTD

  • Charlie Cook

    Military | Staff Sergeant | Gunner | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    15 May 1943 on a practice bombing mission in aircraft A-20B-DL 41-3400, aircraft caught on fire approaching landing at Keevil. Crew returned to service. 67th RG/ 153rd OS. ...

  • Robert Curtis

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Pilot | 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group
    Robert Curtis served as a pilot with the 109th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron. He was Killed in Action on 6 June 1944. He is buried in Rock Island National Cemetery.

Show more

Aircraft

  • 42-102991

    P-51 Mustang

  • 42-103134

    P-51 Mustang

  • 42-103222

    P-51 Mustang
    Whilst on return from armed recon to Montague, jumped by Fw190's and shot down, pilot 1st Lt Stanely L Canner baled out and evaded capture, with the assistance of the Maquis until their area was overrun by freindly forces. MACR 6662. 14-7-44.

  • 42-103226

    P-51 Mustang
    Assigned to 107TRS, 67TRG, 9AF USAAF. Failed to Return (FTR) visual recon mission to Aachen, Germany. Last heard of chasing a lone Fw190 and closing on him. Presumed either hit by flak or bounced and shot down. 23-Dec-44 Pilot 1Lt Charles J Smith...

  • 42-103230

    P-51 Mustang

  • 42-103357

    P-51 Mustang

  • 42-103364

    P-51 Mustang

  • 42-103370

    P-51 Mustang

  • 42-103378

    P-51 Mustang

  • 42-103409

    P-51 Mustang

Show more

Citations

DUC for operations along the coast of France, 15 Feb-20 Mar 1944, when the group flew at low altitude in the face of intense flak to obtain photographs that aided the invasion of the Continent

Revisions

Date Contributor Update
22 August 2019 13:30:26 Emily Changes to type, motto, insignia, us air force combat units of world war ii description and citations
Sources

Air Force Combat Units of WWII

Date Contributor Update
22 February 2017 12:12:40 general ira snapsorter Changes to stations
Sources

Stations added with details from:
- "Battle Colors Volume III - Insignia and Tactical Markings of the Ninth Air Force in World War Two' by Robert A. Watkins;

Date Contributor Update
28 September 2016 16:31:21 general ira snapsorter Changes to aircraft associations
Sources

Merged with duplicate entry to include detils from Paul Andrews, Project Bits and Pieces, 8th Air Force Roll of Honor database

Date Contributor Update
28 September 2016 15:24:19 general ira snapsorter Changes to us air force combat units of world war ii description and description
Sources

Consolidation of duplicate units and connections to reflect the Group's structure according to "Air Force Combat Units of World War 2", Ed. Maurer Maurer, Office of Air Force History. Washingto D.C. 1983. (p.133)

Date Contributor Update
04 July 2016 16:19:20 Lucy May Changes to type, name, air forces, unit part of associations, unit encompassing associations, unit previously was association, person associations, aircraft associations, stations and media associations
Sources

Brought in information from a duplicate record for this unit. Source:
Units in the UK from ETOUSA Station List, as transcribed by Lt. Col. Philip Grinton (US Army, Retired) and extracted by IWM; air division data from L.D. Underwood, based on the 8th Air Force Strength Report of 6th August 1944, as published in 'The 8th Air Force Yearbook' by Lt. Col. John H Woolnough (1980)

Date Contributor Update
27 September 2014 18:42:46 AAM AAM ingest
Sources

Drawn from the records of the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force, Savannah, Georgia / The Mighty Eighth. A History of the Units, Men and Machines of the US 8th Air Force.' by Roger A. Freeman (1989). 'Air Force Combat Units of World War II' compiled by the Department of the US Air Force, edited by Maurice Maurer (1983).

Share