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Langar

Military site : airfield

Langar was built in the latter half of 1942 in the parish of Harby, which is the name locals used to refer to the base. It was built to a standard Class A specification, with 6,000 foot and 4,200 foot runways, hardstandings for aircraft (originally 36, then increased to 50) and two T2 hangars (increased to four when part of the airfield was used as Horsa glider storage). The airfield was home to a series of Troop Carrier Groups in 1944: the 435th, 438th and 441st. The airfield was also used as a centre for the modification of CG-4A gliders. RAF Bomber Command took over the airfield in October 1944, and left in March 1945. Retained by the Ministry of Defence, the airfield was selected by the Royal Canadian Air Force as an air supply base, to support its role as part of NATO. The airfield was improved and several different types of transport aircraft used it until, in 1943, the RCAF left. Today, British Parachute Schools operate from the airfield, providing sky-diving training.

Detailed history

Not yet known

English Heritage's record description

A former World War Two and Post-war period military airfield, now a civilian parachute school and an industrial/ storage site. It was opened in 1941 as a "Class A" bomber base: that is one with three long hard-surfaced runways, with two aircraft hangars (type T2). In 1942 the Avro Repair Organisation opened a repair facility for aircraft at the south-west side of the airfield. In 1943 the hangarage was doubled and hard standing provision for aircraft was increased. Initially the Royal Air Force operated the airfield, it passed to the United States 9th Air Force in 1943, and was used by both air forces in 1944. Its main role was for bomber units, both operational and training, but it was also used for assault gliders: the Americans used the airfield for part of Operation Market Garden, the attack on Arnhem. A prisoner of war camp was based at the airfield towards the end of the war. It operated as a work camp for German prisoners, who worked as labourers in the local area. This could have been in use up until 1948. Post-war the base was operated by the Royal Air Force and the Royal Canadian Air Force. The military phase of use finished between 1964- 1968 and the aircraft repair facilities closed by 1967. Since 1966, part of the site has been used by John Deere Limited for offices training and storage of agricultural machinery parts, and since 1977 by British Parachute Schools.

Service

People

  • Cyril Babcanec

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Co-Pilot | 441st Troop Carrier Group
    From Pennsylvania. Killed in action on 23 September 1944, after his aircraft C-47 Skytrain 42-101007 nicknamed "Buzz Job Mike" was hit by flak over Nijmegen on a glider towing mission. Other members of his crew reported seeing him in his position prior...

  • George Bennett

    Military | First Lieutenant | Navigator | 441st Troop Carrier Group
    23 September 1944, his aircraft C-47 Skytrain 42-101007 nicknamed "Buzz Job Mike" was hit by flak over Nijmegen on a glider towing mission. He was taken prisoner.

  • Orville Journey

    Military | Technical Sergeant | Engineer | 441st Troop Carrier Group
    Killed in action on 23 September 1944, after his aircraft C-47 Skytrain 42-101007 nicknamed "Buzz Job Mike" was hit by flak over Nijmegen on a glider towing mission.

  • Robert Kirry

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Pilot | 441st Troop Carrier Group
    23 September 1944, his aircraft C-47 Skytrain 42-101007 nicknamed "Buzz Job Mike" was hit by flak over Nijmegen on a glider towing mission. He was taken prisoner.

  • Eldon Robbins

    Military | Staff Sergeant | Radio Operator | 441st Troop Carrier Group
    23 September 1944, his aircraft C-47 Skytrain 42-101007 nicknamed "Buzz Job Mike" was hit by flak over Nijmegen on a glider towing mission. He was taken prisoner.

Aircraft

  • 42-101007 Buzz Job Mike

    C-47 Skytrain
    On 23 September 1944, hit by flak on a glider-towing mission over Nijmegen. Eyewitnesses reported after being hit, the aircraft went into a steep vertical climb and cut their glider loose, before the crew lost control of the aircraft which crashed. Two...

Revisions

Date Contributor Update
03 September 2019 12:46:05 Emily Changes to english heritage description
Sources

Historic England National Monument Record SK 73 SW 23

Date Contributor Update
27 September 2014 18:02:17 AAM AAM ingest
Sources

Barry Anderson, Army Air Forces Stations (Alabama, 1985) / Roger Freeman, Airfields of the Ninth Then And Now, (London, 1994)

http://www.bpslangar.co.uk/default.aspx?id=ee14ed46-5d8c-49aa-9d92-ecbed...

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