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8th Air Force 252

8 March 1944

Official description

Not yet known

Description

The VKF ballbearing factory at Berlin/Erkner is the primary target for 623 heavy bombers despatched by all three Air Divisions. Fighter opposition and anti-aircraft fire are intense. There are so many formation attacking that some divert to other Targets of Opportunity close by to avoid collisions and over-flying of formations. Losses are high but not considered too severe at 5.939%. Bomber gunner claims for all Air Divisions were bundled in source data as 63-17-19 (probably exaggerated. Claims listed under 3AD Mission event). Mission Summary follows:

3rd Air Division: A combined force of 179 B-17s from: 94BG; 95BG; 96BG; 100BG; 384BG; 388BG; 390BG; 447BG; and 452BG are despatched to Berlin/Erkner, 98 are effective on the target; 33 others divert to attack the industrial areas of Wildau, Germany and other Targets of Opportunity. 23 aircraft Failed to Return (FTR) - 41KIA 169POW. 1 aircraft listed by Freeman as DBR was actually repaired - 1KIA 3POW 6RTD. 65 aircraft are damaged (apportioned). 1 airman is KIA and 5 others are WIA in returning aircraft. There are no other losses or casualties.

1st Air Division: A combined force of 235 B-17s from: 91BG; 92BG; 303BG; 305BG; 306BG; 351BG; 379BG; 381BG; 384BG; 401BG; 457BG; and 482BG are despatched to bomb Berlin/Erkner. Fighter opposition against this force is light. 222 are effective on Berlin/Erkner; 3 others bomb Targets of Opportunity (TOs). 4 aircraft Failed to Return (FTR) (Freeman lists 5, but only 4 could be confirmed from MACR records) - 4KIA 34POW 2EVD. 86 aircraft were damaged (apportioned). 1 airman is KIA and another 2 are WIA in returning aircraft. There are no other losses or casualties.

2nd Air Division: A combined force of 209 B-24s from: 44BG; 93BG; 389BG; 392BG;445BG; 446BG;448G; 453BG; and 458BG are despatched to bomb Berlin/Erkner. 150 are effective on Berlin/Erkner; and 33 divert to bomb Berlin City as a Target of Opportunity (TO). 9 aircraft Failed to Return (FTR) - 40KIA 49POW(1DIC) 2RTD (rescued by ASR). 4 aircraft with battle damage are Damaged Beyond Repair (DRB) in crash landings upon return - 10RTD. 77 aircraft are damaged (apportioned). 1 airman is KIA another 7 are WIA in returning aircraft. There are no other losses or casulaties.

Mission details

1.

Description

BOMB TARGETS OF OPPORTUNITY

Aircraft type

B-17 Flying Fortress

Notes

It has not been determined which 1st Bomb Division Groups bombed this target.

Mission Statistics

Tonnage dropped 6.00
Number of aircraft Effective 3

2. BERLIN

Description

INDUSTRIAL AREA

Aircraft type

B-24 Liberator

Notes

It has not been determined which 2nd Bomb Division Groups bombed this target.

Mission Statistics

Tonnage dropped 82.00

3. BERLIN/ERKNER (Primary)

Description

BALL BEARING FACTORIES

Aircraft type

B-17 Flying Fortress

Notes

The lead aircraft of 45th Combat Bomb Wing (CBW) was hit by an enemy aircraft and turned back, the deputy took over but turned short of the Initial Point (IP) to avoid a collision with another Combat Bomb Wing approaching the IP, so the 45th CBW ended up attacking Wildau. Again, Luftwaffe opposition is fierce, 23 bombers and 16 fighters are lost. However, the bombers and their fighter escort take a terrible toll on the Luftwaffe. Groups participating are all part of 3rd Bomb Division

Units

  • 100th Bomb Group

    100th Bomb Group

    Group
    "The Bloody Hundredth", so-called because of a reputation for losing a high number aircraft and crews, flew B-17s from Thorpe Abbotts, Norfolk. Their losses were not the highest of any Eighth Air Force Group but on several occasions the Group lost many...

  • 385th Bomb Group

    385th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 385th Bomb Group, who took the nickname "Van's Valiants" after their first Commanding Officer Col. Elliot Vandevanter, flew B-17s from Great Ashfield, Suffolk. The Group led the famous attack on the Focke-Wolfe aircraft factory at Marienburg on 9...

  • 390th Bomb Group

    390th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 390th Bomb Group flew B-17 Flying Fortresses from Framlingham, Suffolk, between July 1943 and the end of the war in Europe. The Group was engaged in strategic missions until the invasion of Europe when its role became more of a tactical one. This...

  • 447th Bomb Group

    447th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 447th Bomb Group flew B-17 Flying Fortresses on strategic bombardment missions out of Rattlesden, Suffolk. With their first mission coming on Christmas Eve, December 24, 1943, their main focus was hitting sites that would weaken enemy forces...

  • 94th Bomb Group

    94th Bomb Group

    Group
    Activated 15 June 1942 at MacDill Field, Florida. Initial organization and training at Pendleton Field, Oregon on 29 June 1942; Primary flight training at Davis-Monthan Field in Arizona from 28 Aug. 42 to 31 Oct. 42; then at Biggs Field, El Paso, Texas...

  • 95th Bomb Group

    95th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 95th Bomb Group was the only Eighth Air Force Group to be awarded three Distinguished Unit Citations. The first, shared by all four Bomb Wing Groups, was for the bombing of an aircraft factory under intense enemy fire at Regensburg on 17 August...

Mission Statistics

Tonnage dropped 186.50
Number of aircraft Sent 146
Number of aircraft Effective 98
Number of aircraft Missing In Action 23
Number of aircraft Damaged 1
Number of people Killed In Action 43
Number of people Wounded in Action 5
Number of people Prisoners of War 169
Enemy aircraft claimed as Destroyed by Bomber Command 63
Enemy aircraft claimed as Probably Destroyed by Bomber Command 17
Enemy aircraft claimed as Damaged by Bomber Command 19

4. BERLIN/ERKNER (Primary)

Description

BALL BEARING FACTORIES

Aircraft type

B-17 Flying Fortress

Notes

457th BG MISSION NO 9 - BERLIN, GERMANY

8 MARCH 1944

Seventeen aircraft returned to Erkner and the VK.F. ball bearing works, this time with excellent results. Ten combat wings, totaling 620 bombers of the Eighth Air Force, were dispatched, accompanied by 500 fighters, the largest number of fighter escort planes assembled to date to escort the bombers. A total of 470 bombers attacked the primary target.

The 457th comprised the low box of the 94th Combat Wing. Major Francis was Air Commander and Lt. Charles D. Brannan was pilot.

The route to the target was flown as briefed. The area surrounding the target was clear and bombing was visual. The factory was blanketed with bombs, which covered the target area with fire and smoke. Other smaller industrial buildings were hit and the railway station was destroyed.

Again the Group was attacked by enemy fighters; however, the friendly fighter support was excellent. Anti aircraft fire was moderate, with nine aircraft sustaining damage. No aircraft were lost.

The lead wing of the 3rd Air Division met fierce fighter Opposition and sustained heavy losses. A total of thirty-eight.

Units

  • 303rd Bomb Group

    303rd Bomb Group

    Group
    The 303rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) was activated on 3-Feb-1942 at Pendleton Field, Oregon. They assembled at Gowen Field, Idaho on 11-February 1942 where it conducted flight training until 12-Jun-1942. The Group then moved to Alamogordo Field, New...

  • 305th Bomb Group Can Do

    305th Bomb Group Can Do

    Group
    The 305th Bombardment Group (Heavy), nicknamed "Can Do" was activated 1-March-1942 at Salt Lake City Air Base, Utah which was their primary training base until 11-Jun-1942 when they relocated to Geiger Field, Washington until 29-Jun-1942, then on to...

  • 306th Bomb Group The Reich Wreckers

    306th Bomb Group The Reich Wreckers

    Group
    Constituted as 306th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Mar 1942. Trained for combat with B-17's. Moved to England, Aug-Sep 1942, and assigned to Eighth AF Eighth Air Force in September 1942 Station 111 Thurleigh. During combat,...

  • 351st Bomb Group

    351st Bomb Group

    Group
    The 351st Bomb Group flew strategic bombing missions from their base at Polebrook, Northamptonshire from April 1943 to June 1945. The Group's most famous member was Hollywood actor Clark Gable, who flew four/ five missions with them as an observer...

  • 379th Bomb Group

    379th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 379th Bomb Group (H) (heavy), based at Kimbolton, flew more sorties than any other Bomb Group in the Eighth Air Force and dropped a greater bomb tonnage than any other Group. The B-17 Flying Fortress Group was awarded two Distinguished Unit...

  • 381st Bomb Group

    381st Bomb Group

    Group
    The 381st Bomb Group flew B-17 Flying Fortresses from Ridgewell, Essex between June 1943 and April 1945. The Group was awarded two Distinguished Unit Citations, the first for bombing shipyards at Bremen, whilst under heavy attack, on 8 October 1943 and...

  • 384th Bomb Group

    384th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 384th Bomb Group flew B-17s from Grafton Underwood, Northamptonshire, between May 1943 and June 1945. They were engaged in daylight bombing missions over Germany as part of the Allies' efforts to destroy the effectiveness of the Luftwaffe by...

  • 401st Bomb Group

    401st Bomb Group

    Group
    The 401st Bomb Group flew B-17 Flying Fortresses from Deenethorpe, Northamptonshire, from November 1943 to June 1945. Starting their missions at that time meant the focus was very much on the coming invasion attempt of France planned for the following...

  • 457th Bomb Group

    457th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 457th Bomb Group began combat operations during the Big Week of 20-25 February when American bombers carried out concentrated raids against German aircraft bases, factories and assembly plants. The air crews' targets on that first mission were...

  • 482nd Bomb Group

    482nd Bomb Group

    Group
    The 482nd Bomb Group was a Pathfinder Group, which using radar-equipped aircraft to support bombing missions until March 1944. Aircraft from this Group went ahead of other Bombers and sent information back about the best routes to take and the extent...

  • 91st Bomb Group The Ragged Irregulars

    91st Bomb Group The Ragged Irregulars

    Group
    The 91st Bombardment Group (Heavy) was activated at Harding Field, Louisiana on 15-April-1942 and went to MacDill Field, Florida for the first phase of training from 16-May-1942 to 25-June-1942. The Group was then assigned to 2nd Air Force at Walla...

  • 92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favoured Few

    92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favoured Few

    Group
    The 92nd Group sometime after arrivial in the UK converted to the role of in-theater combat crew indocrination and training. For this role, the Group traded its B-17F complement and obtained the B-17E, mostly from the 97th BG which was departing for...

Mission Statistics

Tonnage dropped 367.50
Number of aircraft Sent 235
Number of aircraft Effective 222
Number of aircraft Missing In Action 4
Number of people Killed In Action 4
Number of people Wounded in Action 2
Number of people Evaded 2
Number of people Prisoners of War 34

5. BERLIN/ERKNER (Primary)

Description

BALL BEARING FACTORIES

Aircraft type

B-24 Liberator

Notes

One Group plus 9 aircraft of another Group from 2nd Bomb Division constituted a second wave in the attack. They had been directed in their target briefing that if they could not hit the ball bearing plant which was their primary target, they were to drop their bombs on the city of Berlin. The commander of this wave was Col. Ardery, and the lead aircraft was that of Major Jack W. Dieterle, his deputy. The first wave completely obliterated the primary target, which was no longer visible from the massive cloud of pitch black smoke rising from it. However, Dieterle's plane did not initiate a bomb run over the center of Berlin as expected. Ardery says in his book (p. 174), "We kept flying over heavily built-up areas. Why didn’t the bombardier in Dieterle’s ship let go? We know now we were only bombing the city, and one place was about as good as another. What were they holding their bombs for? I called Dieterle. 'Why the hell don’t you let them go? We’ll be past the city in another hour of this kind of flying.' 'Sorry, the bombardier wants to bomb the railroad yards. Bomb line almost here.' A few seconds later the bombs were away from the lead ship and in quick succession from every other ship of the gangling formation." This target was thoroughly demolished. Col. Ardery led the formation home after heavy losses from intense anti-aircraft fire and the shooting down of a couple of planes that had fallen behind from engine damage. Losses were less than expected and the mission was considered a success.

Units

  • 389th Bomb Group

    389th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 389th Bomb Group, known in more familiar terms as "the Sky Scorpions", flew strategic bombing missions in B-24 Liberators from Hethel, England. They also sent detachments to join bases in North Africa at Benghazi No. 10, Libya, between 3 July 1943...

  • 392nd Bomb Group

    392nd Bomb Group

    Group
    The 392nd Bomb Group flew B-24 Liberators out of Wendling, Norfolk from August 1943 until April 1945. They were the first Group to be given B-24H Liberators, the first B-24 model that was fitted with a nose turret on the production line, an adaptation...

  • 445th Bomb Group

    445th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 445th Bomb Group flew B-24 Liberators from Tibenham, Norfolk. The crews' first mission was bombing U-boat installations at Kiel on 13 December 1943. The Group continued to hit strategic targets in Germany, including the aircraft components factory...

  • 448th Bomb Group

    448th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 448th Bomb Group was a B-24 Liberator Group that flew out of Seething, Norfolk. The Group flew their first mission on the 22nd December 1943 and over the next eighteen months the air crews flew 262 missions over occupied Europe. These bombing...

  • 44th Bomb Group The Flying Eightballs

    44th Bomb Group The Flying Eightballs

    Group
    The 44th Bombardment Group (Heavy) was activated 15-January-1942 at McDill Field, Florida and equipped with B-24Cs. The Group moved to Barksdale Field, Louisiana and acted as a training unit for the 90th 93rd and 98th Bomb Groups and flew anti...

  • 453rd Bomb Group

    453rd Bomb Group

    Group
    As well as strategic bombardment missions, the 453rd Bomb Group also ferried cargo on two occasions. They hauled petrol, blankets, and rations to France in September 1944 and dropped ammunition, food and medical supplies near Wesel during the airborne...

  • 458th Bomb Group

    458th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 458th Bomb Group (H) entered combat with the 8th Air Force in February 1944. Based at Horsham St. Faith in England, the combat crews participated in the decisive Campaigns 'Big Week', 'Big B', D-Day and the assault on Germany's oil industry waged...

  • 93rd Bomb Group

    93rd Bomb Group

    Group
    93rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) was activated 1-March-1942 at Barksdale Field, Louisiana. On 15-May-1942 the Group moved to Ft. Myers, Florida to continue advanced flight training and also to fly anti-submarine patrols over the Gulf of Mexico; they...

Mission Statistics

Tonnage dropped 346.50
Number of aircraft Sent 209
Number of aircraft Effective 150
Number of aircraft Missing In Action 9
Number of aircraft Damaged Beyond Repair 4
Number of people Killed In Action 41
Number of people Wounded in Action 7
Number of people Prisoners of War 49
Number of people Died in Captivity 1
Number of people Returned To Duty 42

6. WILDAU (Opportunistic)

Description

INDUSTRIAL AREA

Aircraft type

B-17 Flying Fortress

Notes

Units comprise 45th Combat Bomb Wing of 3rd Bomb Division.

Units

  • 388th Bomb Group

    388th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 388th Bomb Group flew strategic bombing mission from Knettishall, Suffolk from June 1943 to the end of the war. During this time, though, detachments were sent to Fersfield, Norfolk to conduct Aphrodite missions. In these Aphrodite missions veteran...

  • 452nd Bomb Group

    452nd Bomb Group

    Group
    The 452nd Bomb Group flew B-17 Flying Fortresses from Deopham Green, Norfolk, from January 1944. The air crews hit strategic sites in Germany but also supported the movement of ground forces across Europe after D-Day. On 6 June 1944 itself, the Group...

  • 96th Bomb Group

    96th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 96th Bomb Group flew B-17 Flying Fortresses to targets across occupied Europe from May 1943 to April 1945. ...

Mission Statistics

Tonnage dropped 217.00
Number of aircraft Sent 33
Number of aircraft Effective 33

Service

People

  • Robert Abrams

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Bombardier | 452nd Bomb Group
    Shot down by fighters on a mission to Erkner, Berlin on 8 Mar 1944 in B-17G #42-37954 'Hank from Dixie'. Killed in Action (KIA). PH

  • John Adamson

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Pilot | 458th Bomb Group
    Hit by flak and fighters on a mission to Erkner, Berlin on 8 Mar 1944, B-24 #42-28720 and crashed near Finsterwalde. Killed in Action (KIA).

  • Philip Ardery

    Military | Major General | Pilot | 389th Bomb Group
    Silver Star/ 2 DFCs/ 4 Air Medals/ Croix de Guerre Was command pilot on 1 Aug '43 raid on Ploesti ...

  • Robert Blackwell

    Military | Technical Sergeant | Ball Turret Gunner | 453rd Bomb Group
    Shot down 8 April 1944 in B-24 #4128650 'Rooster. ' Prisoner of War (POW). POW

  • James Braa

    Military | Staff Sergeant | Ball turret gunner | 389th Bomb Group
    James Braa served as a ball turret gunner with the 566th Bomb Squadron of the 389th Bomb Group, flying bombing missions out of Hethel, England. He completed his tour of 30 missions between March and June 1944, flying his final two missions on D-Day.

  • William Bull

    Military | Sergeant | Tail Gunner | 381st Bomb Group
    After graduation from the Waterford High School, William Bull worked at the General Electric Co plant in Schenectady, NY. He enlisted in February 1943 and followed aerial gunnery training. Sent overseas, he was assigned to the 381st Bomber Group /...

  • James Buttermore

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Co-Pilot | 96th Bomb Group
    Shot down by fighters on a mission to Erkner, Berlin on 8 Mar 1944, B-17G #42-31576 crashed near Wegenstadt after the crew baled out near Helmstedt, GR. Prisoner of War (POW). POW

  • Enrico Carpini

    Military | Technical Sergeant | Radio Gunner | 305th Bomb Group Can Do
    My dad, Enrico 'Rick' Carpini was from Linden, NJ and served as a radio gunner on a B-17G with the 305th Bomb Group/365th Bomb Squadron. He flew 30 missions from 1/4/44-5/22/44. The pilot was John F. Schleifer from Buffalo, NY. ...

  • John Chapman

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Co-Pilot | 303rd Bomb Group
    On 8-Mar-44 in B-17G 42-31471 "Doolittle's Destroyers" while serving as Co-Pilot the aircraft was damaged by flak near Berlin and later attacked by ME109s on a mission to Erkner, Germany. All of the crew baled out near Haldensleben, Germany and were...

  • Leroy Chappell

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Navigator | 96th Bomb Group
    Shot down by fighters on a mission to Erkner, Berlin on 8 Mar 1944, B-17G #42-31576 crashed near Wegenstadt after the crew baled out near Helmstedt, GR. Prisoner of War (POW). POW

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Aircraft

  • 42-30595 'Gremlin Gus II' "Olin's 69'ers"

    B-17 Flying Fortress
    Delivered Cheyenne 26/6/43; Smoky Hill 13/7/43; Kearney 16/7/43; Dow Fd 19/7/43; Assigned 560BS/388BG Knettishall 20/7/43; (34m) transferred Aphrodite project as OLIN'S 69'ERS; when War Weary, fuselage cut down and vehicle windshield fitted before open...

  • 42-30778 Old 66/Lady Margaret

    B-17 Flying Fortress
    Delivered Cheyenne 28/7/43; Gore 6/8/43; Pendleton 12/8/43; Reno 14/8/43; Pierre 16/8/43; Assigned 561BS/388BG Knettishall 3/9/43; crashed on take off for France 13/8/44 with Leon Sutton, Co-pilot: Harlan Thompson, Navigator: George Healy, Bombardier:...

  • 42-31083 Tenny Belle

    B-17 Flying Fortress
    Delivered Cheyenne 15/9/43; ...

  • 42-31471 Dolittle's Destroyers

    B-17 Flying Fortress
    B-17G 42-31471 was delivered at Cheyenne 5-Nov-43; Kearney 20-Nov-43; Prestwick 7-Dec-43; Assigned 360BS/306BG [PU-E] Thurleigh 1-Jan-44; On 8-Mar-44 the aircraft was despatched to bomb the VKF Ball Bearing Works at Erkner, Germany outside Berlin. The...

  • 42-31576

    B-17 Flying Fortress
    Delivered Denver 20/11/43; Gt Falls 25/11/43; Kearney 22/12/43; Romulus 31/12/43; Presque Is 2/1/44; Assigned 339BS/96BG [QJ-G] Snetterton 16/1/44; Missing in Action Erkner 8/3/44 with Dick Lemanski, Co-pilot: Jim Buttermore, Navigator: Leroy Chappell,...

  • 42-3291 Miss Mac

    B-17 Flying Fortress
    Delivered Denver 30/4/43; Dow Fd 13/6/43; Assigned 561BS/388BG Knettishall 14/6/43; on training mission 12/7/44 with Major Boardman Reed, Co-pilot: Major Melvin Buckner, Flight engineer/top turret gunner: Paul Weathers, Radio Operator: Ora Kelsey, pass...

  • 42-38029 No known nickname

    B-17 Flying Fortress
    Delivered Cheyenne 18 July 1943; Syracuse 10 December 1943; Presque Isle 15 December 1943. Coming from Stansted Air Depot, it was assigned on 1 March 1944 to the 381st Bomb Group/532nd Bomb Squadron at Ridgewell - ID letters VE-M. 1 mission. Missing in...

Revisions

Date Contributor Update
18 January 2019 00:20:41 Dieterle Changes to description
Sources

Richard Dieterle, corrected a typographical error.

Date Contributor Update
17 January 2019 18:41:26 Dieterle Changes to person associations
Sources

Philip Ardery, Bomber Pilot: A Memoir of World War II (Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky: 1978) 168-179.

Date Contributor Update
17 January 2019 18:35:46 Dieterle Changes to event
Sources

Philip Ardery, Bomber Pilot: A Memoir of World War II (Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky: 1978) 174. Added by Richard Dieterle.

Date Contributor Update
06 April 2017 13:44:19 Valerie Lemanski Holley Changes to person associations and aircraft associations
Sources

1st Lt. Richard F. Lemanski Pilot Vaierie Lemanski Holley Collection
#42-31576 - B-17G
Group Squadron Sq Code A/C Code
96BG 339BS
MIA 1944-03-08 - MACR #: 3426
Notes 42-31576 Delivered: Denver 20/11/43; Gt Falls 25/11/43; Kearney 22/12/43; Romulus 31/12/43; Presque Is 2/1/44; Assigned: 339BS/96BG [QJ-G] Snetterton 16/1/44; MIA Erkner 8/3/44 Pilot: Dick Lemanski, Co-Pilot: Jim Buttermore, Navigator: Leroy Chappell, Bombardier: Frank Sewell, Engineer / Top Turret Gunner: Matt Mendys, Radio Operator: Dave Hohm, Ball Turret Gunner: Phil Kierstead, Waist Gunner: Jeff Roberts, Waist Gunner: Edgar Currie, Tail Gunner: Dean Shuck (10POW); Enemy aircraft, crashed between Wegenstedt & Calvorden, 13 miles NE of Helmstadt A/Fd, Germany. MACR 3426.
Source B-17 Master Log - Dave Osbourne

Date Contributor Update
21 February 2016 18:16:41 Lee8thbuff Changes to description
Sources

Lee Cunningham 21-Feb-2016. Corrected typo in 3AD Summary.

Date Contributor Update
21 February 2016 18:15:12 Lee8thbuff Changes to event
Sources

Lee Cunningham 21-Feb-2016. Corrected statistics and added bomber gunner claims on enemy aircraft to 3AD element based on "Losses of the 8th & 9th Air Forces", Stan Bishop & John A. Hey MBE.

Date Contributor Update
21 February 2016 17:58:50 Lee8thbuff Changes to description
Sources

Lee Cunningham 21-Feb-2016. Added Mission Narrative per "The Mighty EIghth War Diary", Roger A. Freeman and "Losses of the 8th & 9th Air Forces", Stan Bishop & John A. Hey MBE.

Date Contributor Update
13 May 2015 13:32:06 general ira snapsorter Changes to event
Sources

Mission detail added courtesy of Diane Reese - http://www.457thbombgroup.org/Narratives/ma9.html

Date Contributor Update
27 September 2014 18:43:11 AAM AAM ingest
Sources

Lee Cunningham, 8th Air Force missions research database / Stan Bishop's 'Losses of the US 8th and 9th Air Forces', the Combat Chronology of the US Army Air Forces and the work of Roger Freeman including the 'Mighty Eighth War Diary'.

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