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IX Troop Carrier Command Field Order 1

6 June 1944

Official description

During the preceding fight and during the day over 1,400 C-47’s, C-53’s, and gliders deliver glider troops and paratroops, including 3 full airborne divisions, which are to secure beach exits to facilitate inland movement of seaborne assault troops.

A total of about 30 airplanes, Medium Bombers (fighters and transports) are lost.

Description

IX Troop Carrier Command Field Order No 1 was originally issued on 31 May 1944, before being amended on 4 June 1944. It determined the role that 9th Air Force Troop Carrier Command would play in the assault phase of Operation Neptune- the Normandy Landings on D-Day, 6 June 1944.

Mission details

1. OPERATIONAL SUMMARY

Description

The Force's mission was to "transport and re-supply parachute and glider elements of the 82nd Airborne Division and the 101st Airborne Division". This was accomplished through three phases.

Aircraft type

Not yet known

Notes

Not yet known

Mission Statistics

Tonnage dropped 2,053,925 Pounds freight dropped
Number of aircraft Sent 2174
Number of aircraft Effective 17,282 Troops dropped on Objective
Number of aircraft Missing In Action 41
Number of aircraft Damaged 449- Level of damage unclear

2. PHASE ONE / Sainte-Mere-Eglise

Description

The first phase was accomplished in the early hours of D-Day and involved the delivery of parachute and glider infantry of the two airborne divisions on a total of 6 drop landing zones close to Sainte Mere Eglise where they were to be used to assist the inland progress of the assault troops landing on Utah Beach.

In the closing hours of D minus 1 (5 June 1944) C-47 Skytrains and C-53 Skytroopers of 9th Air Force Troop Carrier Command began to take off, some serving as tugs for CG-4A gliders.

The Aircraft proceeded to three wing assembly areas over Britain before heading for the coast. From that point the air train proceeded along a 10 mile wide command channel towards the Cherbourg peninsula, avoiding heavy anti-aircraft fire in the Channel Islands. Three naval craft provided with radar beacons marked the course.

Aircraft type

C-47 Skytrain

Notes

The force was supported by RAF Stirlings who flew a diversionary mission, and were escorted by night fighters on No 11 Group, RAF.

Mission Statistics

3. PHASE TWO

Description

The second phase saw over 400 C-47 Skytrains and C-53 Skytroopers towing as many CG-4A and Horsa gliders in the support missions on the afternoon of D-Day and morning in D plus 1 (7 June 1944)

The aircraft were supported by fighter groups of IX Fighter Command

Aircraft type

Not yet known

Notes

Not yet known

Mission Statistics

4. PHASE THREE

Description

Phase 3 concluded the work of 9th Air Force Troop Carrier Command in the assault on Utah Beach.

In parallel with the second Phase, the 3rd Phase saw more than 320 C-47 Skytrains and C053 Skytroopers dispatched to resupply the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions on the morning of D plus 1 (7 June 1944). Ground conditions and enemy reactions obstructed the re-supply of the ground troops, as the operation was carried out as pre-planned and was not informed by the situation of the combat troops on the ground. This meant that supplies fell in enemy territory.

Aircraft type

Not yet known

Notes

Not yet known

Mission Statistics

Service

People

  • Donald Ashling

    Military | Technical Sergeant | Crew Chief | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Joseph Baldwin

    Military | Lieutenant | Co-Pilot | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Claire Beck

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Pilot | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Jackson Beyer

    Military | Lieutenant | Co-Pilot | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Frank Bleier

    Military | Staff Sergeant | Radio Operator | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Henry Boswell

    Military | Major | Paratrooper
    Duke had one of the most dangerous jobs in the army: he was a paratrooper. He enlisted aged 16 and became a paratrooper in 1942. He carried out four combat jumps – in Sicily, Italy, Normandy and Holland. ‘Your plane might get hit before you get there....

  • Virgil Buie

    Military | Lieutenant | Pilot | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Gerald Calladine

    Military | First Lieutenant | Navigator | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Anthony Camarda

    Military | Second Lieutenant | Navigator | 316th Troop Carrier Group

  • Cletis Carmean

    Military | Technical Sergeant | Crew Chief | 316th Troop Carrier Group

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Aircraft

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Revisions

Date Contributor Update
13 December 2018 14:21:29 Emily Created entry with name, date, official description, description, person associations and aircraft associations
Sources

US Air Force Combat Chronology

9th Air Force History

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