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41-9045

B-17 Flying Fortress

Assigned 414BS/97BG Polebrook 3/42; transferred 92BG Bovingdon 24/8/42; crash landed Agricultural College, Athenry, Ireland, near Galway Bay, 15/1/43 ex N/Africa after taking part in 1st Prov Grp of Gen Brereton in Eritrea (as No 8.). En route Portreath, Cornwall with Tom Hulings, Co-pilot: Jim McLaughlin, Navigator: Clyde Collins, Radio Operator: Larry Dennis, Flight engineer/top turret gunner: Ed Parish, Tail gunner: Sgt Tucker plus passengers:-Generals Barnes, Palmer, Brooke, Col Sexton, Major Hormelnwere, Capt Rawlings, Sgts Pippin, Herrie, Planchard, Bery, Tocer and Bollard (18 Returned to Duty). Aircraft was dismantled and returned to USAAF base at Langford Lodge. Salvaged. STINKY. Although sometimes listed as having the name Tennessee Belle there is no evidence to support this aircraft ever having being given this name. [ex- Joe Baugher: The forced landing, due to faulty navigation, could have been very embarrassing as it was carrying Lt Gen Jacob Devers (anon) and his staff on a fact finding tour of the ETO. The Irish should, by international law interned them, but instead were treated to an impromptu banquet and taken to the Northern Ireland border !]

Service

Units

  • 92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favoured Few

    92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favoured Few

    Group
    The 92nd Group sometime after arrivial in the UK converted to the role of in-theater combat crew indocrination and training. For this role, the Group traded its B-17F complement and obtained the B-17E, mostly from the 97th BG which was departing for...

  • 97th Bomb Group

    97th Bomb Group

    Group
    The 97th Bomb Group flew the Eighth Air Force's first heavy bomber mission from the UK when they bombed a marshalling yard at Rouen on 17 August 1942. Just a month later though the Group were reassigned to the Twelfth Air Force and left England for the...

People

  • Clyde Collins

    Military | Lieutenant | Navigator | 92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favoured Few
    92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favored Few p. 68 Losses of the 8th and 9th lists a crash landing at Athenry, County Galway, Ireland on 15 January 1943. The B-17 41-9045 'Tennessee Belle' was returning from North Africa to Cornwall. Fame's Favored Few and...

  • Jack Gaffney

    Military | Master Sergeant | Crew chief | 91st Bomb Group The Ragged Irregulars
    In addition to his mechanic duties, Sgt Gaffney created "nose art" for seven different 91st BG Fortresses. He painted nose art for "Invasion II" (42-5070), "The Bad Egg" (41-24484), "The Sky Wolf" (41-24527), "Shamrock Special" (42-29591), "Destiny's...

  • Thomas Hulings

    Military | Major | Pilot; Squadron Commander | 306th Bomb Group The Reich Wreckers
    Losses of the 8th and 9th lists a crash landing at Athenry, County Galway, Ireland on 15 January 1943. The B-17 41-9045 'Stinky' was returning from North Africa to Cornwall. He was with the 92nd BG in 1942 completed his tour with group in October 1943;...

  • James McLaughlin

    Military | Lieutenant | Co-Pilot | 92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favoured Few
    92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favored Few p. 68 Losses of the 8th and 9th lists a crash landing at Athenry, County Galway, Ireland on 15 January 1943. The B-17 41-9045 'Tennessee Belle' was returning from North Africa to Cornwall. McLaughlin became an...

  • Edward Parrish

    Civilian | Engineer | 92nd Bomb Group Fame's Favoured Few
    Losses of the 8th and 9th lists a crash landing at Athenry, County Galway, Ireland on 15 January 1943. The B-17 41-9045 'Tennessee Belle' was returning from North Africa to Cornwall.

Places

  • Bovingdon

    Military site : airfield
    Bovingdon, in Hertfordshire (often confused with Bovington, Dorset), was built in 1941-42 as a bomber station but was never developed into a fully-fledged heavy bomber airfield as it did not have the required 2,000 yard runway. ...

  • Langford Lodge

    Military site : airfield
    Planned to be a Satellite Landing Ground for No. 23 Maintenance Unit at RAF Aldergrove, Langford Lodge was selected in October 1941 to be developed as an air deport for the maintenance and repair of USAAF aircraft. A scheme was devised whereby the...

  • Polebrook

    Military site : airfield
    Polebrook was laid down for RAF Bomber Command use in 1940-1941. Built by George Wimpey and Co. Ltd, it had short runways which were lengthened for USAAF heavy bomber use. The RAF used the base for operational trials - including of B-17 Flying...

Events

Event Location Date
Assigned Polebrook, Peterborough PE8, UK March 1942

97th BG

Assigned Bovingdon, Hemel Hempstead, UK 24 August 1942

92nd BG

Crashed Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland 15 January 1943

Crash landed at the Agricultural College

Revisions

Date Contributor Update
14 September 2020 18:34:32 jmoore43 Changes to description
Sources

Added a space before the words "Tail gunner" in the A/C “Description” to aid clarity.

Date Contributor Update
03 May 2020 11:40:40 RayWells Changes to description
Sources

Correction of name on Biography.

Date Contributor Update
07 June 2017 15:42:14 Stinky45 Changes to description
Sources

This plane is often quoted as aka Tennessee Belle...having researched this particular plane over a period of 12 years, culminating in the publishing of Eagles Over Ireland I can confirm that the plane was never named Tennessee Belle. I contacted "Kid Rock" ...Jack Gaffney in the USA he was the original nose artist of B17E 41-9045 and he confirmed that this aircraft was his first to paint and name. He confirmed it as being 'STINKY' when he painted it on the ground in the USA. I have photos of the plane getting an engine changed/maintained at Meeks Field Iceland on its way over to Polebrook to join the 97th. The plane was transferred to Nth Africa when several B17Es were swapped out to the 92 BG. It was still called 'STINKY' at this time...evidence for this is found when Elliot Roosevelt receives his DFC at Gibraltar 'STINKY' on the apron in the same photo. I now move onto Ireland where on the 15th January 1943 the plane crash lands with a research party of Top Brass headed up by General Jacob Loucks Devers finds themselves on Neutral soil. The party were repatriated within 24 hours to Northern Ireland UK. Again all pictures show the plane with it's distinctive marking and name 'STINKY'...the plane was at the crash site for weeks. Finally a crew and lorries arrived with poor tooling and literally used sledge hammers and other crude methods to dismantle the plane into manageable scrap pieces and removed same to Langford Lodge in the North of Ireland, UK. So it appears for the whole of its serviceable life the plane was only known as 'STINKY'. The other name persists in other publications...Bishop...Freeman but no categorical evidence is available to support this notion. Please visit the website which contains the complete story of this plane's service along with all the details of the mission of General Devers and his party.
Website address (which is history ONLY) .... eagles-over-ireland.site50.net (No ...www prefix required)
I leave all other comments by other authors so that readers who follow can determine for themselves the facts that are supported by evidence presented. It maybe a minor point but accuracy in reporting and recording history is important.

Date Contributor Update
02 September 2016 22:56:40 466thHistorian Changes to production block number, manufacturer, nicknames, events, unit associations, person associations and place associations
Sources

B-17 Flying Fortress Story - Roger Freeman

Date Contributor Update
27 September 2014 18:40:07 AAM AAM ingest
Sources

Dave Osborne, B-17 Fortress Master Log

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